Tags Posts tagged with "Gay Agenda"

Gay Agenda

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Anti-Semetic
What will happen when they find out that Israel has a homogeneous Western culture, and is (successfully) protected by massive walls?

Reporter for Windy City Times removed from her position, for uncovering the truth about the Chicago Dyke March.

Gretchen Rachel Hammond of the Windy City Times covered a piece on the “voice of  Chicago’s gay, lesbian, bi, trans and queer community,” the article talked about how some women were asked to leave the Dyke March, as the rainbow flags they were carrying contained Jewish stars on them. It has been noted that during the march on the 24th of June, that three women were kicked out from participating in the march.

Laurel Grauer, was amongst the women that were asked to leave. She stated, “They were telling me to leave because my flag was a trigger to people that they found offensive,” and that, “Prior to this [march] I had never been harassed or asked to leave and I had always carried the flag with me.”

Ellie Otra, another women that was kicked out, stated that the organizers “whispered” and “pointed” at her and that she was asked to either “roll up my Jewish Pride flag or leave.”

“During the picnic in the park, organizers in their official T-shirts began whispering and pointing at me and soon, a delegation came over, announcing they’d been sent by the organizers,” Ellie Otra stated in her post on Facebook. “They told me my choices were to roll up my Jewish Pride flag or leave. The Star of David makes it look too much like the Israeli flag, they said, and it triggers people and makes them feel unsafe. This was their complaint.”

She further stated, “I was thrown out of Dyke March for being Jewish. And yes, there were other Jews there, visible ones even, who weren’t accosted, who had fun, even! And yes, Israel exists in a complicated way. But in this case, it doesn’t matter what Israel does or doesn’t do. This was about being Jewish in public, and I was thrown out for being Jewish, for being the “wrong” of Jew, the kind of Jew who shows up with a big Jewish star on a flag. No matter how much I tried to avoid conflict, to explain. Oh, maybe there was a way I could have stayed, but rolling up my beautiful proud flag for them would have been an even bigger loss.”

In her interview with the Israel Times, Hammond stated that she was moved to the sales department and is currently on the lookout for an editorial job.

“Right now I’m in the sales department,” she told the Times of Israel on Monday. “I’m still a part of the company, and it’s my only source of income. To keep what job I have, I can’t comment on it. As an employee of Windy City Times who has loved the company and loved her role in the company for the past four years, I have to respect my publisher’s decision.”

The Windy Times have confirmed Hammond has been moved, but failed to provide any explanation on as to why the move was made.

Tracy Baim, publisher and executive editor for the paper stated, “I cannot comment on our people, but know that we stand by our reporting on our stories.”

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Texas California
I distinctly remember being told, "This won't be pushed on you, or your family. It's just about consenting adults in private."

Pastors in Houston were quick to express their discontent with Houston Independent School District Superintendent Dr. Richard Carranza wanted to add LGBTQ studies to school coursework.

In a meeting hosted by the Houston Defender, Carranza said, “The LGBTQ movement in the U.S. has a history, and in many cases, many people would call it a civil rights history in terms of acceptance and in terms of who have been leaders of the movement.” He added, “I think its part of the American history. To include that as part of what kids study is just a bigger picture of who we are as America.”

To this, Rev. Dave Welch expressed his discontent with the proposal and stated that Carranza and all those supporting his idea are in fact trying to use classrooms “as a social experiment of a radical political agenda.”

“Carranza is an import from San Francisco, where this kind of propaganda that attempts to equate sexual lifestyles, gender confusion, and hostility toward the traditional family has become the norm,” Welch said in a statement. “The HISD Board of Trustees needs to remind Dr. Carranza that this is Texas, where the people of all ethnicities still believe that our children are to be protected, nurtured, and educated, not used as a social experiment of a radical political agenda.”

“Dr. Carranza, not in our city and not our children,” he continued. “The former mayor of Houston attempted to turn Houston into San Francisco with this same philosophy. Again, this is Houston, Texas, not San Francisco, California.”

Carranza, on the other hand, made it quite evident during his meeting that incorporating LGBTQ studies is only the beginning of the many changes that you would like to implement in the near future.

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Guidance is now banned?!?

On Wednesday, Governor Brian Sandoval (R) signed a legislation to make it illegal for licensed therapists in Nevada to try and convince kids that identify themselves as gay to be heterosexual, a practice commonly called “conversion therapy.”

Sponsored by state Senator David Parks, a Democrat rep from Las Vegas, the legislation states that “‘Conversion therapy’ means any practice or treatment that seeks to change the sexual orientation or gender identity of a person, including, without limitation, a practice or treatment that seeks to change behaviors or gender expressions or to eliminate or reduce sexual or romantic attractions or feelings toward persons of the same gender.”

“Nevada has a long record of passing progressive legislation to protect the LGBTQ community with bipartisan support, and I want to thank Governor Sandoval for signing this critical legislation to protect LGBTQ youth,” Parks said in a statement. “Banning conversion therapy makes Nevada a safer place for children who are at a higher risk of anxiety, depression, substance abuse and even suicide.”

Before it was signed, the bill was amended to contain protections for religious organizations, and clergy whose religious views may require talking to kids about homosexuality in ways that would otherwise be deemed illegal under the clauses of the legislation.

A self-described “bisexual,” Yvette Cantu Schneider, who advocates for LGBTQ rights, claims that conversion therapy doesn’t work and can cause severe issues.

“I think this bill is important because it illegitimatizes the idea that there’s something wrong with being gay,” Schneider said. “I think that’s what makes it important for children. They’re not getting that message that, ‘Hey, there’s something wrong with me.’”

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gay-agenda

Annise Parker is a glutton for punishment.

For the fourth time, the courts have reprimanded Houston’s lesbian mayor for her deceptive practices in pushing the LGBT agenda. This time, the Texas Supreme Court called out the Houston City Council too.

Parker initially made national headlines last year, when she tried to subpoena the sermons of local pastors in an effort to control speech from the pulpit. Rush Limbaugh at the time called it “one of the most vile, filthy, blatant violations of the Constitution that I have seen.”

Parker’s latest brush with the law stems from an ordinance, dubbed the “Equal Rights Ordinance,” designed to allow transgenders to use public restrooms based on their gender identity rather than their sex.

After the City Council initially passed the ordinance, a determined group of citizens – led by the same pastors the mayor tried to censor last year – started a petition to repeal the measure, and quickly gathered the 50,000 signatures that statutorily bind the city to either repeal the bill or put it to a ballot referendum.

Parker and the City Attorney didn’t like that move, so they arbitrarily disqualified signatures from the petition. The problem being, the city Secretary had already certified the signatures, and nobody else involved had the authority to gainsay that.

Parker made her intent to flout the rules clear, when she declared that the entire conversation about LGBT rights is, for her, personal. “The debate is about me. It’s not academic. It is my life that is being discussed,” she said.

With those words, Parker indicated that the courts rebuked her personally when they ruled that the petition was in fact legitimate, and the Council must obey its statutory obligations to either repeal the law, or put it on the ballot. Parker and the Council instead chose their own (illegal) path again.

Instead of a repeal, or a referendum on the ballot, the Council decided to put the repeal of the statute on the ballot.

Cue the state Supreme Court: “The charter clearly requires the vote to be on the ordinance itself rather than its repeal.

“Here, the city council determined that voters should choose between ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ regarding the repeal of the ordinance. The charter, however, when read in conjunction with the Election Code, requires a choice of ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ (or ‘For’ or “Against’) as to the ordinance itself.

“Because the charter clearly defines the city council’s obligation to submit the ordinance – rather than its repeal – to the voters and gives the city council no discretion not to, we hold that this is a ministerial duty,” the court said.

The ruling as stated, in addition to compelling the Council to honor its duties, has the effect of suspending the law.

“If the city council does not repeal the ordinance by August 24, 2015, then by that date the city council must order that the ordinance be put to popular vote during the November 2015 election,” the court ruled. “‘The power of . . . referendum . . . is the exercise by the people of a power reserved to them,’ and this power should be protected.”

With the Court’s rebuke fresh in their minds, the Council members finally drafted a ballot referendum that, although still misleading, actually passes legal muster: “Are you in favor of the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance, Ord. No. 2014-530, which prohibits discrimination in city employment and city services, city contracts, public accommodations, private employment and housing based on an individual’s sex, race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age, familial status, marital status, military status, religion, disability, sexual orientation, genetic information, gender identity or pregnancy?”

David Welch, a spokesman for the coalition responsible for the petition, was frank in his assessment of the ruling and the mayor. “Recognizing that Mayor Parker has attempted every possible means of silencing the voters of the city, repeatedly violating the law while doing so, we are pleased that ‘We the People’ will finally have the opportunity to speak on whether Houston should criminalize people of faith, suppress religious freedom and allow men in women’s restrooms,” he said.

State Senator Paul Bettencourt (R-Houston) called out Parker for her four-loss streak, saying the mayor refuses to “get straight with the law.”

“Taxpayers have a right to know that their money is not being spent to circumvent the law,” he continued. “The recent ruling by the Texas Supreme Court continues to show that Houston does indeed have a problem.

“It is now more than clear that the city of Houston is forcing taxpayers to spend their personal money against the government simply to get Mayor Annise Parker and the city to follow the law. It is not the role of local government to spend taxpayer money to actively ignore lawfully collected petition signatures and suppress petitions signed by those they are sworn to represent, much less use deceptive ballot language, per a Supreme Court ruling,” he said.

The end result is that, after several attempts at heavy-handed dictatorial tactics, the citizens of Houston have gotten at least some of their voice back.

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